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  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 06/25/2024 at 11:00 AM (PDT)

    This webinar will cover the role of SCWO to transform waste inputs into usable byproducts.

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    Member fee: $25.00

    Non-Member fee: $35.00 

    1.2 Contact Hours towards CWEA Certifications: CSM, ECI & EIT. 

    Reuse water used for irrigation and aquifer recharging is especially beneficial in arid and semi-arid regions, but also in general to reduce dependency on other natural resources. In addition, reuse plays an important role in building sustainability and resilience in design and construction. Often overlooked aspect of recovery in municipal wastewater is water from sludge, which typically contains between 75 to 95% moisture. 

    A private real estate investment firm in Texas is developing a reclaimed industrial site in Houston with a vision of creating a circular and sustainable waste management opportunity within the new development. The goal is to transform wastewater, food waste, and other recyclable wet organic wastes into recoverable and reusable clean water, energy, and nutrients. The technologies being considered for this approach include membrane bioreactor, supercritical water oxidation and ultraviolet light disinfectant. 
    The combination of these technologies’ makeup the treatment scheme for this decentralized water reuse facility, which is being developed in partnership with 374Water, a global social impact, cleantech company that provides unique decentralized water resource recovery facilities. The challenge with a fixed treatment asset is maintaining consistency of wastewater feed. In other words, would the development produce the same or similar volume of waste, with uniform constituents, on a daily basis. 

    One way to overcome this challenge and to maximize the beneficial use of the investment, the facility will employ sewer mining, a process where municipal wastewater from the pipeline, with consent from the City, will be drawn and used as a supplement waste to offset variation in waste generated from the development on a daily basis. Simply put, in order to stabilize the flow and feed characteristics of the waste to be treated, wastewater from the sewer will be drawn at a rate that brings the overall waste to the average treatability volume and quality for each of the technologies being employed. This webinar will cover the role of SCWO to transform waste inputs into usable byproducts.


    Sudhakar Viswanathan

    Vice President

    374Water

    Sudhakar (Sunny) Viswanathan is Vice President at 374Water, a global cleantech, social impact company based in Durham, NC. He has a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in environmental engineering, he is a Syracuse University alumnus with nearly 25 years of industry experience including leadership positions at Suez and Veolia; He has authored over 35 technical papers and currently spearheads the commercialization and business development of the Supercritical Water Oxidation technology.

    Registrants who view the live webinar to see the slides and hear the audio and then enter the correct attention check code (directions below) will receive 1.8 contact hours towards CWEA's certifications: CSM, ECI & EIT. 

    To receive your contact hours for viewing the live webinar, please note the two (2) different attention check codes that will be displayed at two different points during the webinar in the top left or right corner of the presentation for approximately 90 seconds.  Please enter these codes as 1st attention check code – 2nd attention check code (XXXX-XXXX) in the Attention Check Code component under the "Contents" tab.  

    Please note, all user activity of CWEA certification holders on the Online Wastewater Education Network is subject to the CWEA Code of Ethics standards for professional conduct and ethics. Certification holders should receive credit for a training only once within the same contact hour period. Any attempt to undermine the certification process may be subject to ethics procedures and possible sanctions. It is not possible to receive contact hours for both attending the live webinar and viewing the recording.  

    Once you have entered the correct attendance check codes, you will be able to create and download an electronic certificate of completion under the "Contents" tab.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/12/2024

    AC24 Conference and Expo; Mission: Possible - A Sustainable Water Future Against All Odds. April 9-12, Sacramento

    CWEA Members: $20.00
    Non-Members $30.00
    CWEA Contact Hours: 1.0 contact hours towards CWEA Certifications: LAB, AWTO

    Growing concerns associated with contaminants of emerging concerns (CECs) (especially PFAS), greenhouse gas emissions, and regulations have begun to limit the end-use alternatives for biosolids. In response to these pressures, biosolids producers are considering new and innovative treatment options that require a new perspective to the historical understanding of biosolids treatment and end-use. Orange County Sanitation District (OC San) has embarked to seek a new technology, Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) to diversify their end products from water reclamation facilities (WRRFs). OC San teamed with 374Water that is collaborated Hazen and Sawyer, and Merrell Brothers to demonstrate this technology at their site. SCWO is a promising technology that converts organic material (biosolids) to inert gases, minerals and water. Water above 374°C and 22.1 MPa becomes supercritical, a special state where organic solubility increases, and oxidation processes are accelerated.

    SCWO has been recently shown to destroy hazardous substances such as halogenated compounds including poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). Studies showed a greater than 99% reduction of the total PFAS identified in a targeted compound analysis, including perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) (Krause et al, 2022). As a destructive technology, SCWO is proposed as an alternative to incineration and other combustion processes and could be a permanent solution for PFAS-laden biosolids or solid matrices. However, additional investigation of reaction byproducts: water, solids and air emissions need to be conducted for a complete assessment of SCWO’s potential as a safe and effective technology.

    OC San is located in South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and an air permit is required for this demonstration project. The research team, including OC San (a Utility), 374Water (a private firm-technology provider), Hazen and Sawyer (a consulting firm), Yorke Engineering (permitting support), Alliance Testing (a source testing firm) worked together to develop a rigorous test plan and granted a research permit to implement SCWO at Plant 1. This presentation will focus on the technology and design details, and provide the steps taken to implement this technology at OC San. The information will benefit utilities that seeks sustainable solution for their biosolids management considering recent end-use restrictions."

    Learning Objectives:
    Define supercritical water oxidation process and list the advantages/disadvantages of this innovative technology
    Describe the steps to take to implement SCWO
    Identify the testing necessary to permit SCWO facility."


    Mohammad Abu-Orf

    Vice President & Residuals Group Practice Leader

    Hazen and Sawyer

    Sudhakar Viswanathan

    Vice President

    374Water

    Sudhakar (Sunny) Viswanathan is Vice President at 374Water, a global cleantech, social impact company based in Durham, NC. He has a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in environmental engineering, he is a Syracuse University alumnus with nearly 25 years of industry experience including leadership positions at Suez and Veolia; He has authored over 35 technical papers and currently spearheads the commercialization and business development of the Supercritical Water Oxidation technology.

    Registrants who view the live webinar to see the slides and hear the audio and then enter the correct attention check code (directions below)1.0  contact hours towards CWEA's Contact Hours. LAB,  AWTO

    To receive your contact hours for viewing the live webinar, please note the one (1) attention check code that will be displayed during the webinar in the top left or right corner of the presentation for approximately 90 seconds.  Please enter this code in the Attention Check Code component under the "Contents" tab.  

    Please note, all user activity of CWEA certification holders on the Online Wastewater Education Network is subject to the CWEA Code of Ethics standards for professional conduct and ethics. Certification holders should receive credit for a training only once within the same contact hour period. Any attempt to undermine the certification process may be subject to ethics procedures and possible sanctions. It is not possible to receive contact hours for both attending the live webinar and viewing the recording.  

    Once you have entered the correct attendance check code, you will be able to create and download an electronic "Certificate of Completion" under the "Contents" tab.

  • Contains 4 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/12/2024

    AC24 Conference and Expo; Mission: Possible - A Sustainable Water Future Against All Odds. April 9-12, Sacramento

    Cost: Complimentary 
    No Contact Hours Offered

    In California WRRFs are facing uncertainty with their current land application programs related to anticipated PFAS regulations. In addition, with the diversion of organics from landfills by SB 1383 the main strategy is co-digestion followed by composting to produce a Class A biosolids for beneficial use. However, with the emerging challenges related to PFAS, the composting part of this strategy may be impacted as it does not provide any PFAS treatment. On the other hand, drying produces Class A biosolids and is required upstream of advanced thermal processes for PFAS treatment including pyrolysis and gasification. Drying the dewatered digestate rather than composting provides an opportunity to limit the impacts of anticipated PFAS biosolids regulations.

    This presentation will cover three thermal drying case studies that will benefit utility managers, operation and maintenance practitioners, and engineers by providing:
    • a highlight of the thermal drying sizing, technology selection, and dried product characteristics,
    • system integration with existing WRRFs including sludge conditioning,
    • the lessons learned including equipment procurement, staffing, and challenges in operation from previous thermal drying designs., and
    • integration insights for future pyrolysis/gasification PFAS treatment.

    Attendee Takeaways:

    Conduct thermal drying sizing, technology selection, and describe the dried product characteristics.
    Understand system integration with existing and future solids treatment.
    Define project delivery and operations based upon lessons learned from thermal drying case studies."


    Anthony Tartaglione

    Senior Assiocate

    Hazen and Sawyer

    Anthony is a Senior Associate with Hazen and Sawyer and has 23 years of experience in water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) planning, design, and services during construction. This experience includes project management, design engineering management, and lead process / mechanical engineering of the expansion, rehabilitation and repair, upgrades, and improvements for WRRFs throughout the country. He received a BS in Environmental Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a MS in Chemical Engineering from Colorado State University. His area of expertise is in solids treatment from preliminary treatment through digestion including screening, grit removal, thickening, anaerobic digestion, and dewatering. He is a contributing author to Water Environmental Federation publications including 1) Design of Water Resource Recovery Facilities. Manual of Practice No. 8, 6th Ed., Water Environmental Federation Publication, 2017; 2) Energy in Water Resource Recovery Facilities, Manual of Practice No. 32, 2nd Ed., Water Environmental Federation Publication, 2021 and 3) Wastewater Treatment Fundamentals III, 1st Ed., Water Environmental Federation Publication, 2022. He is registered Professional Engineer the states of California (Civil & Chemical Engineering), Florida, Idaho (Civil & Chemical Engineering), Maryland, North Dakota, New York, Oregon (Civil & Chemical Engineering), and Texas.

    NO CONTACT HOURS OFFERED FOR THIS WEBINAR

    To receive your contact hours for viewing the live webinar, please note the one (1) attention check code that will be displayed during the webinar in the top left or right corner of the presentation for approximately 90 seconds.  Please enter this code in the Attention Check Code component under the "Contents" tab.  

    Please note, all user activity of CWEA certification holders on the Online Wastewater Education Network is subject to the CWEA Code of Ethics standards for professional conduct and ethics. Certification holders should receive credit for a training only once within the same contact hour period. Any attempt to undermine the certification process may be subject to ethics procedures and possible sanctions. It is not possible to receive contact hours for both attending the live webinar and viewing the recording.  

    Once you have entered the correct attendance check code, you will be able to create and download an electronic "Certificate of Completion" under the "Contents" tab.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/12/2024

    AC24 Conference and Expo; Mission: Possible - A Sustainable Water Future Against All Odds. April 9-12, Sacramento

    CWEA Members: $20.00
    Non-Members $30.00
    CWEA Contact Hours: 1.0 contact hours towards CWEA Certifications: LAB, AWTO

    This presentation will review the cost to manage biosolids in various New England states, and the impact that PFAS has had on utilities’ operating budgets and operations for biosolids management. Maine’s land application moratorium, signed by the governor, will be discussed, including its short- and long-term impacts. The reactions of nearby states such as New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts’s to EPA’s PFAS roadmap; Maine’s moratorium; and growing negative public perception will be reviewed such that California agencies can learn from New England utilities’ experiences. We will also review successes in these states, where progress has been made working with regulators, communities, activist groups, and local legislative bodies.

    EPA currently has not set any policies on PFAS in NPDES permitting, nor PFAS in biosolids. However, CERCLA has recently proposed designation of PFOS and PFOA as hazardous materials, which could impact water reclamation facilities and potential liabilities. States are taking matters into their own hands, ranging from a “do-nothing” approach to instituting a statewide ban on the land application of biosolids (Maine) which has severely disrupted biosolids management . Many states are moving toward “report only” requirements in NPDES permits for influent, effluent, and biosolids to increase the database of PFAS in the environment.

    What should California do? To date, most states have not imposed PFAS standards in NPDES permits or biosolids, but Michigan’s EGLE has done precedent-setting work on PFAS in WW and mitigating sources. Utilities and consultants need to be prepared to educate communities, the legislature, regulators, and other stakeholders on the direct and indirect impacts of regulations and legislation around PFAS and water reclamation facilities. Industries discharging to WRFs need to participate in the conversation and become part of the solution through source control. In parallel, the science needs to continue to be developed and expanded, to better understand the true health and environmental implications of these compounds. This presentation aims to continue the conversation and information sharing so measured and thoughtful actions can be taken to address this issue in a fiscally and environmentally responsible manner, and so Californians can benefit from and implement the best practices.

    Attendee Takeaways: 
    Understand the value of biosoli.
    Understand the value of biosolids to our communities and impact of PFAS regulations.
    Success ways to communicate with regulators, legislature and other key stakeholders.
    Understand the state of the science and current understanding of PFAS in Biosolids.ds to our communities and impact of PFAS regulations."


    Eric Spargimino (he/him/his)

    Principal

    CDM Smith

    Kenneth Hui (he/him/his)

    Environmental Engineer

    CDM Smith, WA

    Kennneth Hui, PE, P Eng, M Eng, BCEE, PMP is an environmental engineer with CDM Smith. He has 28 years of progressive experience in planning, evaluation and design of water and wastewater treatment facilities. His experience includes leading multi-disciplinary teams to successfully complete a $400 million portfolio of wastewater treatment and water treatment facilities expansion projects through design and construction, to operation in North America.


    Samir Mathur

    Water Reclamation Practice Leader

    CDM Smith

    Registrants who view the live webinar to see the slides and hear the audio and then enter the correct attention check code (directions below)1.0  contact hours towards CWEA's Contact Hours. LAB,  AWTO

    To receive your contact hours for viewing the live webinar, please note the one (1) attention check code that will be displayed during the webinar in the top left or right corner of the presentation for approximately 90 seconds.  Please enter this code in the Attention Check Code component under the "Contents" tab.  

    Please note, all user activity of CWEA certification holders on the Online Wastewater Education Network is subject to the CWEA Code of Ethics standards for professional conduct and ethics. Certification holders should receive credit for a training only once within the same contact hour period. Any attempt to undermine the certification process may be subject to ethics procedures and possible sanctions. It is not possible to receive contact hours for both attending the live webinar and viewing the recording.  

    Once you have entered the correct attendance check code, you will be able to create and download an electronic "Certificate of Completion" under the "Contents" tab.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/11/2024

    AC24 Conference and Expo; Mission: Possible - A Sustainable Water Future Against All Odds. April 9-12, Sacramento

    CWEA Members: $20.00
    Non-Members $30.00
    CWEA Contact Hours: 1.0 contact hours towards CWEA Certifications: ECI,LAB, AWTO

    As more WRRFs in California implement potable reuse schemes, and the impact of nutrients on coastal waters is recognized, biological nitrogen removal is expected to expand dramatically along the coast. Upgrading to nitrogen removal can significantly increase the cost, energy use, operational complexity, footprint requirement and climate impact of these facilities, and so determining the most efficient and sustainable treatment strategy is critical. Anammox is a unique biology that has been widely implemented in sidestream treatment to reduce costs and improve sustainability and efficiency, but this technology has not yet been implemented widely in mainstream secondary trains. This presentation will review two new technological developments that promise to bring the benefits of Anammox biology to mainstream secondary treatment.

    First, we will describe the challenge of adapting the partial-nitration/Anammox process (PN/A) from hot, concentrated centrate treatment to dilute, cool secondary treatment. This strategy boasts the highest potential reductions in aeration energy, carbon requirements and sludge production, but is also the most challenging to operate and maintain. Challenges associated with NOB inhibition will be discussed, and a novel strategy, developed by Tomorrow Water and demonstrated with Black & Veatch at the Hyperion Water Recovery Plant in LA, will be described. We will share data from lab and pilot-scale facilities, highlighting the newest developments in process design and the relationship of critical control variables (inhibition frequency, temperature, nitrogen species ratio, etc.) We will also discuss the knowledge gaps that remain in order to bring this novel strategy into wide implementation.

    Secondly, we will describe an alternative strategy for mainstream Anammox implementation: partial denitrification/Anammox (PdN/A). This strategy was developed in plants in the mid-Atlantic, and is now being commercialized for deployment in California (and worldwide). The process uses the same Anammox biology, but in concert with different supporting organisms (heterotrophic denitrifiers instead of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.) This presentation will compare PN/A and PdN/A strategies, explaining the differences in process design, control, and achievable efficiency gains between the two different strategies. Participants will be provided with hypothetical plant scenarios and polled to determine which of the two strategies would be more applicable in a given context

    Learning Objectives:
    Quantify the benefits of the mainstream anammox process in terms of energy, carbon requirements, sludge production and plant intensification.
    Differentiate between the two distinct implementation strategies of mainstream anammox (PN/A vs PdN/A) and understand their comparative advantages and challenges
    Describe a novel PN/A strategy piloted at Hyperion WRP, and how this strategy fits in to the larger industry effort to commercialize mainstream PN/A for improved plant efficiency and sustainability


    Jon Liberzon

    Emerging Markets Process Engineering Lead

    Black & Veatch

    Jon Liberzon is Vice President at Tomorrow Water, a California-based subsidiary of BKT, where he spearheads a portfolio of new treatment processes including high-rate bio-filtration for wet weather flows, Proteus advanced primary treatment, AMX shortcut nitrogen removal and Draco thermal hydrolysis. Before joining Tomorrow Water, Jon consulted for a range of industrial and multinational clients including the World Bank, Technoserve and DFAT. From 2012-2017, he was director of water technologies at Algal Scientific, which developed high-rate nutrient recovery processes for food and beverage factories. Jon also helped develop algae-based photosynthetic aeration systems and worked on drinking water and agricultural development projects in several least developed countries, including Haiti and Vanuatu. Jon holds a Masters from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, and a Bachelors degree from the University of Michigan.

    Victory F. Dsane

    Process Engineer

    Tomorrow Water (BKT)

    Eric Redmond

    Engineer

    Black & Veatch

    Shahrouzeh Saneie

    Senior Environmental Engineer

    LA Sanitation

    Registrants who view the live webinar to see the slides and hear the audio and then enter the correct attention check code (directions below)1.0  contact hours towards CWEA's Contact Hours. ECI,LAB,  AWTO

    To receive your contact hours for viewing the live webinar, please note the one (1) attention check code that will be displayed during the webinar in the top left or right corner of the presentation for approximately 90 seconds.  Please enter this code in the Attention Check Code component under the "Contents" tab.  

    Please note, all user activity of CWEA certification holders on the Online Wastewater Education Network is subject to the CWEA Code of Ethics standards for professional conduct and ethics. Certification holders should receive credit for a training only once within the same contact hour period. Any attempt to undermine the certification process may be subject to ethics procedures and possible sanctions. It is not possible to receive contact hours for both attending the live webinar and viewing the recording.  

    Once you have entered the correct attendance check code, you will be able to create and download an electronic "Certificate of Completion" under the "Contents" tab.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/11/2024

    AC24 Conference and Expo; Mission: Possible - A Sustainable Water Future Against All Odds. April 9-12, Sacramento

    CWEA Members: $20.00
    Non-Members $30.00
    CWEA Contact Hours: 1.0 contact hours towards CWEA Certifications: ECI, AWTO

    Eastern Municipal Water District (EMWD) has been evaluating approaches to provide cost effective and robust ways to manage nitrogen at their Regional Water Reclamation Facilites (RWRFs). Their facilities are facing many challenges; increasing facility loads, maximizing existing infrastructure and providing Operations staff additional tools to meet effluent compliance. The comprehensive approach that will be presented includes process modelling, optimization, alterative evaluation and Capital Improvement Project (CIP) planning. Through this work, sidestream deammonification was identified as a cost-effective means to meet these objectives. EMWD is leading innovation for the California wastewater profession by implementing some of the first sidestream deammonification facilites in state and the first systems in southern California.

    Whole plant calibrated models were developed for evaluating 1) optimization approaches to reduce effluent nitrogen with existing infrastructure and 2) new facilites and their benefit to meeting effluent nitrogen objectives. This stepwise approach ensured existing facilites were maximized before implementing new infrastructure.

    A sidestream feasibility study was performed focusing on the feasibility of implementing sidestream deammonification, conceptual design, costs, and vendor considerations for the Temecula Valley Reclamation Water Facility (TVRWRF) and the Perris Valley Reclamation Water Facility (PVRWRF). This work determined that sidestream treatment would provide a significant cost savings and provide Operations 80% TIN removal in the sidestream and ~1.5 mg/L effluent total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) reduction from current conditions, increasing operational flexibility to meet the (TIN) limit.

    CIP planning was then completed including evaluating the project phasing, schedule and refinement of costs. Through this work, it was demonstrated that sidestream deammonification could help EMWD extend out the next major expansions at TVRWRF and PVRWRF by more than 5 years each, balancing budget spending, reducing near term budget demands, and more efficient allocation of staff.

    The project is currently in detailed design of the TVRWRF and PVRWRF sidestream deammonification facilites, leveraging Hazen’s extensive sidestream deammonification experience from around the country. The EMWD designs implement some of the latest best practices for sidestream facility design including struvite mitigation approaches instrumentation selection, vendor selection/procurement, operator safety and designing for ease of operations/maintenance while maintaining performance.

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Participants will gain knowledge of how to determine if sidestream deammonification would be beneficial for their facility
    2. Participants will learn about what key factors need to be considered to successfully implement sidestream deammonification at their facilites
    3. Participants will learn about sidestream design best practices from actual operating facilites."


    Bryce Danker

    Associate Engineer

    Hazen and Sawyer

    Bryce Danker is an Associate engineer at Hazen and Sawyer with more than 10 years experience focused on the evaluation and design of wastewater treatment facilities.

    Bryce specializes in wastewater process evaluation, optimization and design. He has extensive experience in process modeling focused on nutrient removal, pilot system design and operation, and full-scale facility evaluation, design, startup and operation. Recent focus area includes process design for large scale potable reuse, PdNA demonstration, sidestream deammonification design and densification demonstration testing.

    He has a B.S. in Civil Engineering from the California Polytechnic University, Pomona, and a M.S in Environmental Engineering from the University of California, Irvine.

    Ken Tagney

    Director of Water Reclamation

    EMWD

    Ken Tagney was the Treatment Process Control Specialist, for the four Eastern Municipal Water District regional water reclamation facilities. Ken holds his Grade V certification. Ken has previously co-presented and co-authored on session topics presented at the 2017 CWEA and WEFTEC conferences. Ken is now Plant Superviosr at the Temecula Valley Regional Water Reclamation Facility for Eastern Municipal Water District.

    Scott Toland

    Engineering Manager

    Eastern Municipal Water District

    Mr. Toland possesses over 28 years of experience as a Civil Engineer in both the private and public sector. During his 17 years in the consulting industry, Mr. Toland provided detailed design, project management, and quality control of large water, wastewater, and recycled water treatment facilities, pipelines, and pump stations. Mr. Toland has managed several design projects through preliminary and final design, in addition to providing construction support and construction management services throughout the construction and commissioning phase. Mr. Toland’s experience carried into the public sector as a project manager for complex and high profile water, reclamation, and biosolids projects, and most recently as an engineering manager responsible for Eastern Municipal Water District’s wastewater and reclamation CIP program. Mr. Toland possesses a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering, and Master of Science degree in Environmental Engineering.

    Registrants who view the live webinar to see the slides and hear the audio and then enter the correct attention check code (directions below)1.0  contact hours towards CWEA's Contact Hours. ECI, AWTO

    To receive your contact hours for viewing the live webinar, please note the one (1) attention check code that will be displayed during the webinar in the top left or right corner of the presentation for approximately 90 seconds.  Please enter this code in the Attention Check Code component under the "Contents" tab.  

    Please note, all user activity of CWEA certification holders on the Online Wastewater Education Network is subject to the CWEA Code of Ethics standards for professional conduct and ethics. Certification holders should receive credit for a training only once within the same contact hour period. Any attempt to undermine the certification process may be subject to ethics procedures and possible sanctions. It is not possible to receive contact hours for both attending the live webinar and viewing the recording.  

    Once you have entered the correct attendance check code, you will be able to create and download an electronic "Certificate of Completion" under the "Contents" tab.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/11/2024

    AC24 Conference and Expo; Mission: Possible - A Sustainable Water Future Against All Odds. April 9-12, Sacramento

    CWEA Members: $20.00
    Non-Members $30.00
    CWEA Contact Hours: 1.0 contact hours towards CWEA Certifications: ECI, AWTO

    "In response to increasingly stringent nutrient regulations, sidestream treatment (SST) processes have entered the U.S. market to meet growing demand. But given a lack of operational familiarity, established design practices, and overall performance outcomes, the process of deciding which technology is the best fit for a given facility is challenging. Owners are reliant on information provided by vendors or published literature for comparing and evaluating tradeoffs between technologies, often basing decisions on nitrogen removal performance, reliability, and cost. To support SST technology decisions, this paper summarizes relevant operating data that the authors solicited from full-scale wastewater facilities with SSTs in the US. The SST processes evaluated include:

    1. Conventional nitrification/denitrification (NDN) SST
    2. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox)
    a. AnoxKaldnes ANITA™ Mox (Veolia)
    b. DEMON® Anammox Treatment Technology (World Water Works)
    c. ANAMMOX® (PAQUES)
    3. Post-aerobic digestion - DigestivorPAD™ (Ovivo)

    1-3 years of full-scale operating data were analyzed from a dozen facilities to calculate and compare the following metrics:
    1. Design criteria
    2. Performance metrics
    3. Alkalinity consumption
    4. Chemical addition
    5. Energy consumption and air demand
    6. Process stability and resilience
    7. Capital and estimated O&M costs
    8. O&M complexity

    The results indicate high ammonia and TIN removal across technologies and installations. In addition, there is significant variance in ammonia/TIN removal within a process category and on an individual plant basis. There are also the occasional outliers of poor performance that could be due to operational upsets. The results for alkalinity consumption are significant in verifying claims that anammox-based processes save alkalinity. The results show alkalinity requirements sometimes exceeding the vendor recommended design ratio of 4:1. This could be explained by unstable deammonification leading to some ammonia removal occurring via conventional nitrification pathways. Though this may be a contributing factor, without operational optimization, it can be expected that anammox-based processes will not result in alkalinity savings. This evaluation highlights the sensitivity of SST processes and the importance of a holistic design approach that properly supports those processes. More needs to be learned as an industry to move closer towards fine-tuned operation and optimal biological performance."

    Learning Objectives:

    "Describe the different nitrogen removal sidestream treatment systems in operation in the US
    List key performance metrics used for evaluating sidestream treatment systems
    Identify potential causes of poor performance for sidestream treatment systems"


    Andre Gharagozian (he/him/his)

    Associate Vice President

    Carollo Engineers

    Andre Gharagozian is an Associate Vice President at Carollo and serves as the regional process lead for wastewater in northern California. He has over 25 years of experience and is a seasoned process engineer with a wide range of experience from facility and master planning, process analysis and design, troubleshooting, operational assistance, and training. Andre’s expertise is in process modeling and nitrogen removal with an emphasis on activated sludge, hybrid systems, and sidestream treatment.


    Registrants who view the live webinar to see the slides and hear the audio and then enter the correct attention check code (directions below)1.0  contact hours towards CWEA's Contact Hours. ECI, AWTO

    To receive your contact hours for viewing the live webinar, please note the one (1) attention check code that will be displayed during the webinar in the top left or right corner of the presentation for approximately 90 seconds.  Please enter this code in the Attention Check Code component under the "Contents" tab.  

    Please note, all user activity of CWEA certification holders on the Online Wastewater Education Network is subject to the CWEA Code of Ethics standards for professional conduct and ethics. Certification holders should receive credit for a training only once within the same contact hour period. Any attempt to undermine the certification process may be subject to ethics procedures and possible sanctions. It is not possible to receive contact hours for both attending the live webinar and viewing the recording.  

    Once you have entered the correct attendance check code, you will be able to create and download an electronic "Certificate of Completion" under the "Contents" tab.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/11/2024

    AC24 Conference and Expo; Mission: Possible - A Sustainable Water Future Against All Odds. April 9-12, Sacramento

    CWEA Members: $20.00
    Non-Members $30.00
    CWEA Contact Hours: 1.0 contact hours towards CWEA Certifications: LAB, AWTO

    In 1988, the California Environmental Laboratory Improvement Act (ELIA) became law and established Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program (ELAP) to evaluate and provide accreditation to environmental testing laboratories in California. Approximately 6 years later, the Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Act, and California Code of Regulations provided the authority and structure of a laboratory accreditation program to standardize and accredit laboratories that analyze environmental regulatory samples relating to human health and environmental decisions in California. However, over time, the accreditation program became outdated, and competence of the environmental laboratories throughout California was in question. So, in May 2020, the State Water Resources Control Board adopted the TNI-2 Standard regulations amending the requirements and standards for accreditation of environmental testing laboratories in California. Prior to this adoption, laboratories were only required to meet the requirements in the analytical methods they perform, but the new standard now required facilities to control a broader scope of influential factors. This standard adoption set off a firestorm throughout the 600+ ELAP certified laboratories who now had to decide if, and how they would implement this new requirement for their agency.

    Understanding that this change was coming in 2017, the Central Marin Sanitation Agency’s (CMSA) discussed its options associated with continued certification within the California ELAP. This same discussion of certification options has occurred throughout the state which has resulted in some labs implementing the new standard and some labs relinquishing certification. CMSA ultimately decided to continue its certification within the ELAP program, so CMSA Laboratory (CMSAL) began its journey into the TNI-2 standard implementation.

    This journey of the TNI-2 standard implementation has required overhaul and implementation of a new Quality Assurance Program, Standard Operating Procedures, Standards, data management systems, laboratory bench sheets, general laboratory operations and a myriad of documentation. This presentation will provide an overview of the process of implementation, examples of different types of documentation, operational changes and the lessons learned associated with the successful implementation of the TNI-2 Standard in February 2023.


    Learning Objectives:
    Understand the magnitude of changes that have occurred within ELAP certified laboratories.
    See examples and discuss the changes to laboratory documentation and operational changes.
    Understand the changes to data quality, documentation and what is next for the laboratory community


    Mark D. Koekemoer

    Regulatory Compliance Manager

    Central Marin Sanitation Agency

    Mr. Koekemoer has managed various Environmental Services Programs over the past seventeen years. As CMSA's Technical Manager, Mr. Koekemoer has implemented and provided oversight to Organic Waste Receiving Monitoring Programs, NPDES Permit Compliance Monitoring Programs, EPA Pretreatment Monitoring Programs, Stormwater Monitoring Programs and various others. Additionally, Mr. Koekemoer has provided oversight for various wastewater related projects including analytical method development, regulatory and process field analytical reliability assessments, and facility process enhancements studies. Mr. Koekemoer has also served on technical advisory committees including the Environmental Laboratory Technical Advisory Committee (ELTAC) within the Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program (ELAP) and Standard Method Joint Task Groups.Mr. Koekemoer has Bachelors and Masters degrees from Texas A&M University.

    Registrants who view the live webinar to see the slides and hear the audio and then enter the correct attention check code (directions below)1.0  contact hours towards CWEA's Contact Hours. LAB, AWTO

    To receive your contact hours for viewing the live webinar, please note the one (1) attention check code that will be displayed during the webinar in the top left or right corner of the presentation for approximately 90 seconds.  Please enter this code in the Attention Check Code component under the "Contents" tab.  

    Please note, all user activity of CWEA certification holders on the Online Wastewater Education Network is subject to the CWEA Code of Ethics standards for professional conduct and ethics. Certification holders should receive credit for a training only once within the same contact hour period. Any attempt to undermine the certification process may be subject to ethics procedures and possible sanctions. It is not possible to receive contact hours for both attending the live webinar and viewing the recording.  

    Once you have entered the correct attendance check code, you will be able to create and download an electronic "Certificate of Completion" under the "Contents" tab.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/11/2024

    AC24 Conference and Expo; Mission: Possible - A Sustainable Water Future Against All Odds. April 9-12, Sacramento

    CWEA Members: $20.00
    Non-Members $30.00
    CWEA Contact Hours: 1.0 contact hours towards CWEA Certifications: LAB, AWTO

    WIth the implementation of the TNI-2 requirements CA-ELAP accreditation, many labs are wrestling with some of the new requirements. One of these requirement new to many labs is the concept of a Management Review. The presentation will endeavor to demystify this process and provide some guidance to help laboratories make it the valuable tool that it can be in improving any business operation.


    Learning Objectives:

    • differentiate between internal audits and management reviews.
    • identify areas needing improvement.
    • conduct an effective Management Review for their laboratory.


    Michael C. Shepherd

    Principal

    Shepherd Technical Services, LLC

    Teresa E. Lopez (she/her/hers)

    Environmental Project Scientist

    Robertson-Byran, Inc.

    Laboratory Supervisor with a demonstrated history of working in the utilities industry. Skilled in HACH WIMS, Environmental Awareness, Environmental Services, Regulations, and Research. Strong research professional with a Master's degree focused in Environmental Forensics from the University of California, Davis.

    Registrants who view the live webinar to see the slides and hear the audio and then enter the correct attention check code (directions below)1.0  contact hours towards CWEA's Contact Hours. LAB, AWTO

    To receive your contact hours for viewing the live webinar, please note the one (1) attention check code that will be displayed during the webinar in the top left or right corner of the presentation for approximately 90 seconds.  Please enter this code in the Attention Check Code component under the "Contents" tab.  

    Please note, all user activity of CWEA certification holders on the Online Wastewater Education Network is subject to the CWEA Code of Ethics standards for professional conduct and ethics. Certification holders should receive credit for a training only once within the same contact hour period. Any attempt to undermine the certification process may be subject to ethics procedures and possible sanctions. It is not possible to receive contact hours for both attending the live webinar and viewing the recording.  

    Once you have entered the correct attendance check code, you will be able to create and download an electronic "Certificate of Completion" under the "Contents" tab.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/10/2024

    AC24 Conference and Expo; Mission: Possible - A Sustainable Water Future Against All Odds. April 9-12, Sacramento

    CWEA Members: $20.00
    Non-Members $30.00
    CWEA Contact Hours: 1.0 contact hours towards CWEA Certifications: LAB, AWTO

    Christopher Hand, ELAP's Senior Environmental Scientist, will present an overview of ELAP's recent updates. The presentation will focus on the 2016 TNI standard incorporated by reference into ELAP's regulations, highlighting available free tools and trainings. The presentation may also address Fields of Accreditation that have changed, including those regulated in wastewater under title 40 of the code of federal regulations, part 136.


    Learning Objectives:

    Understand upcoming required reporting due dates to comply with the reissued Sanitary Sewer Systems General Order.
    Understand the updates to the online California Integrated Water Quality System (CIWQS) Sanitary Sewer System Database.
    Ask questions regarding the Sanitary Sewer Systems General Order requirements and CIWQS.


    Christopher Hand

    Sr. Environmental Scientist

    State Water Board / Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program (ELAP)

    Christopher is a Senior Environmental Scientist with the California Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program where he serves as ELAP’s State Agency Liaison. Christopher is one of ELAP’s Laboratory Certification Officers responsible for accrediting drinking water laboratories; and works in coordination with the Quality Assurance Units at the Division of Drinking Water and the Office of Information Management and Analysis in the State Water Board. He graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from California State University at East Bay, and prior to his role at ELAP, has worked in both a research laboratory and as a lead analyst at an environmental laboratory.

    Teresa E. Lopez (she/her/hers)

    Environmental Project Scientist

    Robertson-Byran, Inc.

    Laboratory Supervisor with a demonstrated history of working in the utilities industry. Skilled in HACH WIMS, Environmental Awareness, Environmental Services, Regulations, and Research. Strong research professional with a Master's degree focused in Environmental Forensics from the University of California, Davis.

    Registrants who view the live webinar to see the slides and hear the audio and then enter the correct attention check code (directions below)1.0  contact hours towards CWEA's Contact Hours. LAB, AWTO

    To receive your contact hours for viewing the live webinar, please note the one (1) attention check code that will be displayed during the webinar in the top left or right corner of the presentation for approximately 90 seconds.  Please enter this code in the Attention Check Code component under the "Contents" tab.  

    Please note, all user activity of CWEA certification holders on the Online Wastewater Education Network is subject to the CWEA Code of Ethics standards for professional conduct and ethics. Certification holders should receive credit for a training only once within the same contact hour period. Any attempt to undermine the certification process may be subject to ethics procedures and possible sanctions. It is not possible to receive contact hours for both attending the live webinar and viewing the recording.  

    Once you have entered the correct attendance check code, you will be able to create and download an electronic "Certificate of Completion" under the "Contents" tab.